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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 4,365 (some duplicates have been removed)
against tracking american citizens in the united states for foreign intelligence purposes. i think i may ask director
european jews begin in the united states? >> guest: well, one could argue it begins as early as the woodrow wilson administration because great britain issued of course it statements balfour declaration in 1917, which said his majesty's government will do whatever it can to provide a homeland for jews in palestine, provided did not validate the rights of the people already there, leading to decades of controversy and woodrow and backed it up a ration that was very, very important. then of course franklin roosevelt to the presidency in 1933, almost exactly coincide with adolf hitler's gaining control in germany. these two men, the democrat and tatar repealing it for another dozen years, first in conflict and then of course and bloody war in his early as the roosevelt administration, discussions began over the persecution of jews in germany. >> host: who is leading those in germany? >> guest: the leading person was an informal adviser and that was felix frankfurter, who roosevelt had no much earlier when he was assistant secretary of the navy and they reestablished a friendship on roosevelt r
. >> senator mccain, i want to start with you. iran is on everybody's mind. what can the united states do working together to deal with iran and prevent iran from acquiring nuclear weapons capabilities? >> thank you and thank you all for the warm welcome. what a great honor it is to be with general yadlin. we once through the same type of airplane. the difference is he used to shoot people down and i got shot down. i have watched a number of senators come to the united states senate. this senator from new york has done a magnificent job in the sense of the state of israel and the defense of freedom. . we recently had an encounter with the president of egypt i can assure you he will not forget the senator from new york. what is happening in iran is obviously, the centrifuges are spending. the latest effort had conciliation and some kind of agreement with the iranians have -- has failed. it is clear they are on the path to having a nuclear weapon. i do not think it is a question of it is a -- questionof whether -- question of whether. it is a question of when. the iranians are watching what
made it very clear that the united states -- the two state solution can be achieved. >> the phone lines are open. you can send us an e-mail. you can join us on facebook. you can also join us on twitter. for our radio audience, i will explain what we are looking at. bb1, referring to netanyahu. i do not know why people think we have had such a contentious relationship. he had a past relationship with president obama. most would deny it. mittsaid that he supported romney. he did not do much to support president obama and this election recycle. --did they do a lot to bid bridge the gaps. , we sawuld be persuaded the israeli public they even though it may started with mistrust towards obama, it ended this week with a lot of affection. --really did manage to build bridge some of these gaps. he arrived in israel on wednesday. he met with the prime minister and president perez. he traveled to the west bank and he met with the palestinian authority. on friday, meeting with the president of jordan before playing tourist yesterday and he asked to washington about iran's ambitions. here is more fr
, for the americans and latin americans here in brazil and not only in brazil but also in the united states, it's a moment in which the church has finally identified you know what? you're there. and for latin americans, it's not only a moment of vindication, it's a moment of acceptance and understanding that they are important to the church's future. you have to understand that 420 million latin americans make up the catholic church. and in the united states, there's about 40 million catholics that are hispanics. it's more than a symbolic gesture. it says something that a pope can now speak in their native tongue, can speak spanish, can really relate to a church that in the united states has been struggling to fill the pews. if you look at the catholics in the united states, 40% -- 47% of catholics in the united states are young, and they're hispanic. and not only are they the future of the church they're the now of the church. and so now having a leader that is known as being the people's pastor, being a universal pastor, someone that can really even bring people back
's coming across. most people in the united states we make up our mine. we don't follow europe. >> right. well i think that's a popular myth and misconception. i lived overseas and russia until recently. one the things that occurred lot a things you see in europe are things that are ahead in some sense what you see in america. the article sit elf was prompted by the whole debate over same sex gay marriage in massachusetts that americans boy this is sort of a fau naphenomew to us. in fact the dutch had legalized gay marriage in 2001. and so in america is really kind of sense catching up so absolutely there's a valts pipeline >> you think that this vaes globalization is going to change the culture. >> it's already changing the culture. >> how so? >> i think that the gay marriage is another issue. yoit anyways yeah through science and technology the so-called abortion pill r uchu t was pioneered in france. there was a great deal of hostility and opposition to it. now it's come over and now it's easily available from doctor or from a clinic. there's no question we're all sort of this mainstr
, the senate, the speaker of the house of representatives, and the president of united states. [applause]>> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. [applause]>> good morning and welcome to the united states capitol. this is a red letter day for the american people, and i am glad you are all here and are taking part in the celebration. since the era of reconstruction, this chamber, which once was the hall of the house of representatives, has become home to statues sent by the states. today, we gather to dedicate a national statue of the late rosa parks in recognition of her many contributions to this nation and to the cause of freedom. it is the first statue of an african-american woman to be placed in this capital. [applause]we are honored to be joined by the president of the united states and members of his and ministration -- his administration. [applause]this is a homecoming of sorts for mrs. parks, who for more than 20 years was an assistant to representative john conyers of michigan. [applause]i want to thank all o
almost any point in time, the united states is more popular than unpopular. americans are much i liked and disliked. as it turned out, you discover there's a very small fringe of political movements in history to see if the teacher in fact were much more popular around the world that we believe in this part of the myth. >> host: over some of the debates? >> guest: it depends on who's asking the question. if you think about the contemporary context, al qaeda seems to have many members were quite angry at the united states for an array of recent and tuition bill. but what i found is very often in the united states our discussion about world opinion sort of rapidly slides into the same that they include foreigners in general. the world hates us to put a washington journalist shortly after 9/11 during the run-up to the iraq war inexplicably when there was the largest coordinated demonstration in february 2003 against the war with iraq. some estimates it can laypeople including antarctica, demonstrated against the war. americans reacted by saying the most hated us. they hate us becaus
that an operatnal leader, an operational leader of -- of a group presenting a threat to the united states, the condition that an operational leader presents an imminent threat of violent attack against the united states does not require the united states to have clear evidence that a specific attack on u.s. persons and interests will take place in the immediate future." now, senator paul, wouldn't it be your understanding that if something is imminent, that it would need to be something occurring immediately? mr. paul: well, yeah, and i think there's really no question about using lethal force against an imminent attack. and i think that's why we need to make the question that we're asking the president very clear, and the question is if planes are attacking the world trade center, we do believe in an imminent response. we do believe in an imminent defense for that. the problem is that if we're talking about noncombatants who might someday be involved, if they are in america, i see no reason why they shouldn't be arrested. mr. lee: and so if we're dealing with something that is imminent,
at the united states but i found very often our discussion of world opinion slides into the sense includes foreigners the world hates us into incoherence to quarter journalist after 9/11 that the whole world would turn against us inexplicably with the largest coordinated demonstration against the of looming war with iraq and americans reacted aha by saying that they hate us for our freedom. but it is not a helpful way to understand behavior and his concept says there is a wall between ourselves and the complexity a decide to look into the history. >> host. >> y 19 -- ct 99? there were books printed of the industrial power and in european countries there was a debate over how to insurer the rising challenge of the new world power would not covert the market that is said dispute of material concerns but they read it as the world is coming to haiti as because we're so successful and wealthy country and free and stand for good which sounds curious with that has been the predominant way americans having gauged when we encounter hostility or lack of cooperation. >>host: are any country's legitim
and the work that we do. about our office here -- i work and the regional office covering that united states and the caribbean. we are largely an advocacy office here and the united states and work closely with the government in all branches and to a lot of outreach. my role here is primarily to respond to inquiries. we work closely with the united states congress and a lot of staffers on capitol hill who are interested in the work we to overseas. my goal is to share information about what we do on a daily basis. 20et questions i heard families moved from camp 82 can't be and south sudan or what are your funding operations in colombia. i tackle issues all over the world. andy day is different nothing is the same. that is wonderful. i have been fortunate enough to participate on the emergency roster team and i've been here almost eight years. i have been fortunate enough to travel. this is really an emergency organization. they're mostly in the headlines when there are massive outflows. right now, we are grabbing the headlines in europe. you hear a bit about molly, less in that united states.
's show find us on itunes. fareed zakaria gps is next for our viewers in the united states. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to you until united states and around the world. first, was there a breakthrough in the nuclear talks this week? is a deal possible? a rare response from the iranian government. i have an exclusive conversation with iran's ambassador to the united nations. >>> then, the automatic spending cuts have kicked in, but are they so bad? maybe not. i've got a great battle to hash it out. >>> with italy's bizarre election results this week, is the euro crisis back? and why is silvio berlusconi so popular? we'll talk to italy's premier journalist. >>> but, first, here's my take. secretary of state john kerry is making news on his first foreign trip swinging through nine countries in europe and the middle east. he's talking about european trade deals, about providing greater assistance to the syrian opposition and he's talking about iran, of course. these are all important issues. but i wonder if kerry should, instead, just visited two countries on his first tr
, the vice president of the united states, joe biden. [applause] >> that was really nice. thank you, mr. president. it's great to be here. it's great to be here. ladies and gentlemen, oh, what a difference four years make. i look out there and see an old friend, annette lantos. annette, how are you? her husband tom lantos, a survivor, was my assistant, was my foreign policy adviser for years, and tom used to say all the time, joe -- he talked that hungarian accent -- joe, we must do another fundraiser for aipac. [laughter] i did more fundraisers for aipac in the 1970s and early 1980s than -- just about as many as anybody. thank god you were not putting on shows like this. we would have never made it. we would have never made it. my lord, it's so great to be with you all and great to see you. mr. president, thank you so much for that kind introduction, and president-elect bob cohen, the entire aipac board of directors, i'm delighted to be with you today, but i'm particularly delighted to be with an old friend -- and he is an old friend. we use that phrase lightly in washington, but it's
. the witnesses before us represent the united states commitment to defend the homeland to help our neighbors and to come to the collective defense of our close allies in europe. the ability to meet these commitments has been put at risk by the arbitrary budget cuts called sequestration. resulting from the budget impasse here in washington. this committee is interested in hearing from each of you on how the continuing resolution and sequestration are affecting military operations and readiness in your areas of responsibility in what would be the effect of sequestration continued. secretary chuck hagel announced changes to the missile defense posture, including plans to deploy an additional 14 ground-based interceptors in alaska in order to stay ahead of the evolving north korean missile threat. two previous intercept flight tests using the latest model of the atmosphere resulted in failures. secretary chuck hagel made clear that we would not deploy the missiles until we have confidence that they will work as intended. the missile defense is taking steps to ensure that this will work reliably
a noncombatant u.s. citizen in the united states? and we all have strong feelings about that program, we all have strong feelings about the war on terror, these are all legitimate issues but this is a very direct question that's been asked. and what would have resolved this hours ago from my understanding and if i'm incorrect, the senator from kentucky will correct me in a moment, my understanding is he has offered two ways to bring this to a resolution. one is just a statement from the white house, a clear, unequivocal statement that says, of course, it's unconstitutional, it's not going to happen, just a straightforward statement of that magnitude. in fact, i've been watching on television over the last few hours, i saw the senator from kentucky say they reached out the white house, they've been unable to get a direct response. maybe that's changed in the interim. i don't know, we'll hear from him in a moment. the other is and i hear he made a motion to have a resolution here that made it clear that was the sense of this body. that the sense of this body would be that this is unconstitutional.
service. is witnesses before represent the united states commitment to defense the homelands to come to the collective defense of our close allies. our ability to meet these commitments has been cut at risk. the committee is interested in there isrom each operations in readiness in the areas of responsibility. last friday the secretary of defense announced changes to our homeland missile defense posture and planned including plans to deploy an additional 14,000 -- 14 ground-based interceptors and alaska to stay ahead of the evolving north korean missile threat. two previous flight tests of the gmd system using the latest model of the xo atmosphere kill vehicle, ce2 resulted in failure. agel make clear that they will work as intended. intended. the missile defense is taking steps to ensure that this will work reliably and effectively before we produce or deployed more. they have already conducted a successful test in january and an intercept test is planned for late this year. we are also planning an earlier center intercepted this summer. we want to demonstrate that the system works
in beirut there were often mixed feelings about the united states, whether for me or others in lebanon. i grew up in many an environment -- in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support or help, but i have a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family do. but inevitably, america's a superpower, and it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades and big fortresses as embassies. and that can be a bit grating on the local population. so it was really interesting or perhaps, um, revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's just a totally different prism through which to look at the issue, to look at the eshoo, the to look at my own country. and i arrived, you know, i'm in the convoy, and i'm sitting there in the convoy and just a few cars ahead of me is another car in that same motorcade surrounded by security escort. this is the secretary of state, and there is jeffrey feldman, um, who is now assistant secretary of state at the state department who used to be ambassador to b
the nominee of the united states. i was given the great privilege of experiencing america in a way that anne and i never anticipated in a way that we thought we would get to do. of course, i left the race disappointed that i didn't win. but i also left honored and humbled to have respected the values we believe in and speak for so many good and decent people. we lost races before in the past, but those setbacks prepared us for larger victories. it is up to us to learn from our mistakes and my mistakes and take advantage of the learning and we take back the white house, get back the senate, and put in place conservative principles. now it is fashional in some circles to be pessimistic about america, about conservative solutions, about the republican party. i utterly reject pessimism. [applause] we may not have carried on november 7, but we have not lost the country we love and we have not lost our way. our nation is full of a pier ration. we're a nation of invention and reinventing. my optimism about america was not diminished by my campaign, in fact, it grew. it grew as i staw people of amer
the united states weather for me or in lebanon. i grew up in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support or help but i had a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family to. but inevitably america is a superpower and it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades and big fortresses and embassies and that can be a bit -- so it was really interesting or perhaps revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's totally different prism through which to look at the issue and to look at my own country. i am in the convoy and sitting there in the convoy and two cars ahead of me as another car in that same motorcades rounded by security escorts. there is a secretary of state and there is jeffrey feldman who is now the secretary of state at the state department who used to be ambassador to beirut and it was his convoy that used to a people in beirut and they used to annoy me when i was stuck at an intersection waiting for him to drive through. and i think it's always worth rememberin
was to eliminate current divorce, a specific type directed against the united states and the u.s. dollar. in fact, harry dexter white, the u.s. treasury representative, markets hand man at bretton woods told them, i quote, dinner at the national monetary fund he was determined to senate was designed for a special purpose and that purpose is to prevent depreciation against the u.s. dollar. and in order to do that, they were going to create a system of fixed exchange rates that would be sustained by this international monetary fund. it may seem rather strange in the current context when the united states is battling other countries and china to adopt flexible exchange rates and to stop pegging the u.s. dollar. the motivation was the same coming to get a more competitive dollar. in the 1940s, all the pressure was separate in the, so countries linking to the u.s. dollar kept the dollar at a high level, whereas today most of the pressure from important emerging market countries in particular, most of the pressure on their currency is a person united states flexible exchange rates to get a more competi
. as you mentioned, yes, growing up in beirut they were often mixed feelings about the united states, whether for me or others in lebanon. i grew up in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support or help but i have a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family do. but it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades. and big fortresses as indices. that can be a bit grating on the local population. so it was really interesting for perhaps revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's a totally different person to which to look at the issue and look at the issue, to look at my own country. and i arrived. i'm in a convoy and i'm sitting there in the convoy and just a few cars ahead of me is another car. in the same motorcades surrounded by escort. there is the secretary of state and there's jeffrey spellman who is now secretary of state for the state department used to be ambassador to beirut. it was his convoy that used to people in beirut. they used to annoy me when i was
to call across the united states. the report pegged the average cost at $3.67. that is down 11 cents from a month ago. the reason for the decline is a drop in cruel oil prices. in the bay area, the average price today for a gallon was $4.14 in san francisco. >>> roles are changing when it comes to who is the bread winner of the household. an analysis shows when one spouse works full time and the other stays home the wife is the soul bread winner in 23% of family. when they first started tracking this, it was 6%. in 12 million families, wives out earn husbands 28% of the time. >>> six months after it opened a store is going to close. when it debuted they filled a place that had been empty for 7 years but the owner says he is not making enough money to pay the rent. officials are looking for another grocer to replace them. >>> four years, inside training. >>> san jose police continue to look for that suspect in the deadly stabbing. this man, he is accused of killing his former girlfriend. she was found stabbed to death on friday on north first stree
a call -- 202-585-3883, if you are outside the united states. you can catch up with us on twitter, facebook, or e-mail us. a very good friday morning to you. i want to take you to some of the headlines about what is being called a charm offensive by president obama. this from the wall street journal this morning -- and from the washington post -- and from the new york times -- there you have a picture from wednesday night at the jefferson hotel in washington, d.c., where senators including tom coburn and saxby chambliss and joined the president for dinner that the president paid for where the deficit reduction issues came up. here's a story from bloomberg -- the story goes on to say the overtures skipped over mitch mcconnell of kentucky and house speaker john boehner. both oppose raising taxes as part of any deal. $1.20 trillion in spending cuts mandated over the next nine years and short-term government funding set to expire on march 27, lawmakers said the coming weeks could provide a chance for long-term deficit reduction bargains that have eluded congress and obama. and to talk
and sophisticated radar on the border protection drones that can help track criminal activity in the united states, just as the c.i.a. uses predators and other drones to spy on militants in pakistan, nuclear sites in iran and other targets around the globe. for decades, u.s. courts have allowed law enforcement to conduct aerial surveillance without a warrant. this is that sort of open spaces doctrine. i'm not saying it makes it right but the government has been doing it for decades. some of the courts have apparently ruled that what a person does in the open, even behind a back yard fence, can be seen from a passing airplane and is not protected by privacy laws. you know, i don't think i agree with that. if you're swimming in your pool in your back yard, if you're in your hot tub in your back yard, just because we have the technology to be able to see you in your hot tub, does that really mean they have a right to look at what you are doing in your back yard, so i don't really accept that. i think it has been abused and something that really we should be fighting against the surveillance state. ad
by the solicitor general personally for united states files a brief in the supreme court. but prepared carefully and as sharp questions at these meetings. as he said in the book, he tried to advance the position of the executive branch, not his own fears. i never saw him favors on position and misunderstand. you conflate knowledge, understanding and intellectual integrity. i plan to tally the stories behind three of these cases. but first i want to mention the last of the solicitor general's tasks, oral argument. bob bork was the best oral advocate is any justice to tell you any argued a lot. twice every session are 14 times the return of the supreme court. his successor as solicitor general attempt to argue between five and 10 cases a year. not bob. he loved to give and take great on his feet. often the main task of an advocate for the united states is to find a new argument to replace the bad one that lost the case in the court of appeals. sometimes the task of an advocate is to patch up the holes in an argument pretty presented the brief, trying to do the justices to say something like well,
laws of the united states for the president to authorize the military to use lethal force within the territory of the united states." in other words, to the senator's point, on one hand he said it would be a hypothetical question, unlikely to occur and one we hope no president would ever have to confront, and then on the other hand he said, it is possible to imagine a scenario under which it would happen. so appearing to say -- to be -- well, cast further lack of clarity on something that should be a straightforward "yes" or "no." mr. paul: mr. president, the interesting thing about saying it's hypothetical and it wouldn't happen, i could buy that except for the fact that our foreign drone strike progr program, a significant amount of the drone strikes are on people not actively engaged in combat. so whether that's right or wrong's another question, but since we already have an example of a significant amount of those not engaged in active combat, it's hard for him to say that this is a rare or unusual, hypothetical thing that could never happen because it seems like it's a big p
here in the united states. >>> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a terrific show for you today with some of the best interviews of the year so far. a king, one of the world's richest men, a prime minister and a former prime minister. first up, king abdullah ii of jordan. the man in the middle of the middle east. his nation sits in the midst of turmoil between syria, egypt, israel, iraq and saudi arabia. then, the richest man in india. mukesh ambani. the first-time tv cameras have ever been allowed inside his 27-story home. also, two prime ministers. dmitry medvedev on syria and his relationship with president putin and the former prime minister john howard of australia on how his country acted after a tragic gun massacre. what the united states can learn. but, first, here's my take. it's a given that washington is broken. that the two parties seem incapable of coming together to get things done. but here is something president obama could probably do by himself that would be a s
, accused of plotting against the united states, he appeared in front of a judge no, not guantanamo bay but in manhattan. we have team fox cover right now. jonathan hunt has more on how the u.s. got this guy into custody. first, led go to david lee miller. where are they holding this man now? ghaith is being held in a federal detention center in lower manhattan. and this facility connects directly to the federal courthouse so there's no problem transporting him. he goes through underground opportunity. as for his court appearance today, lasted a little less than 20 minutes, 10 court officers for security. he entered the courtroom with his hand cuffed behind his back, spoke briefly through an interpreter, and the prosecution said he has been in the united states now for exactly one week to the day, and ask for his defense team, that's going to be paid for by the very country that he wanted to destroy. the judge asked him do you have any money? he said no. at that point the judge said u.s. taxpayers are going to pay for your defense attorney. >> shepard: that's how the hill works. what's
there are differences between the united states and israel, concerni concerning-- or concerning israelis and palestinians to revive the floundering negotiations the peace process, the floundering peace process? >> you know, my main goal on this trip has been to have an opportunity to speak directly to the israeli people at a time when, obviously, what was already a pretty tough neighborhood had gotten tougher and let them know that they've got a friend in the united states, that we have your backs, that we consider israel security of extraordinary importance to us. not just because of the bonds between our peoples, but also because of our own national security interests. in that context, what i have also sought to achieve here is further consultations, building on what we've already discussed, as bb has just formed a new government as i am entering my second term, that you know, we continue to have close consultation around some of the shared interests that we've already discussed. iran being, obviously, a prominent shared concern. i want to make sure that the israel people and israeli g
at his disposal and he was pleading for that time to complete his reports. to the un and united states and the countries egging us on. we know what happened subsequently. the weapons were never found. the war was initiated on the basis of assertions which were described as an accurate improbably simply as fraudulent. i felt that at stake was american credibility worldwide. that does have significant implications for the position of the united states in the world. and i am afraid the standings the united states enjoyed at the end of the cold war and which lasted into the beginnings of the 21st century has been very badly dissipated. that affects us adversely around the world and has serious implications for future decisions that involve war and peace. on the basis of what has happened, what level of confidence are we as citizens entitled to have before initiating a war against iran? we do have some parties who tell us there are red lines that should be drawn immediately to read some of these red lines recently drawn have been crossed. now they are being extended by one year. what happen
, outspoken in his opposition to the united states and kinmanship with cuba's leader fidel castro. seven days of mourning were declared. all school was suspended for the week. an elaborate funeral is expected on friday. >>> here's reaction. >> he changed the mentality of the poor people. venezuela, it's like most of the countries in latin america, you know, we are crowded, poor people, they don't have education. they don't know, you know, who can be bad or who can be worse. he could change -- of everyone. he took power of the country. he -- so i really think again, that he deserved it. >> more reaction from caracas, as nbc's mark potter, thanks for being with us. chavez coming to power t. the poor in the hills or the -- that ride over your shoulders. how are the poor versus others reacting today? >> reporter: well, the poor are reacting with sorrow and i think we're going to see a lot of that very shortly. at first the reaction here was one where people were somber. a lot of people didn't believe he had died, even though he had been sick for a couple years, and the news about his condition wa
principles and values, things of life we got to hear in this united states. here's the thing. they want to create jobs, right ? they want to put everybody back to work. 25 million people out of work. at the same time, it would create a better nation because we would have the money to spend. this is where my point comes that, we have rules in this united states. we have rules that tell us that that theygeneration, are making more money on the street than they are finding any work. we have laws that say that if you commit a crime in these united states, no matter your , we're going to take your rights away is given to you by the constitution. host: we're going to move onto henry, michigan, democrat's line. caller: i find it very disconcerting that these people the departmentut of education. al cÁrdenas was on c-span this morning, talking about how important education was. cpacning to this conference, i am cognizant of the fact that we have people in this country who don't want to see this country succeed. they're not creating jobs, they're talking about people being unemployed, but i don
, the state of israel will have no greater friend than the united states. right now as president meets with prime minister netanyahu, major issues, like syria, iran's nuclear program, stalled peace talks. ish a us taking center stage and joining me live now from jerusalem, host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. also my friend and colleague, martin fletcher. along with "newsweek" daily beast editor, elizabeth roug. when the news conference starts, well take it live. this trip, andrea, a postally a symbolic one but there are very serious foreign policy issues here, not the least of being the civil war in syria. the white house says it is looking into allegations about the use of chemical weapons. the house and intelligence committee says there is quote high probability that chemical agents were useed. what will prime minister netanyahu be asking of the united states in terms of ending the on flikt in syria? >> well, first of all, the president, president obama's, credibility is very, very critical. they is said from the white house podium that any use from the chemical weapo
, this is unprecedented the amount of international sanctions, i think the europeans -- the europeans, bank united states, and whatever you do not do now, you will not do. there is nothing more permanent in the middle east than that which is temporary. if you let them off the hook, they will be left with 5.9 tons of enriched uranium, be it for bonds -- bombs. that could surge forward if inspectors are not there and they decide they want to go forward with new centrifuges. there is a key difference there. i do not see this being bridged at this time. another factor on iran. the new defense minister in israel, who is not viewed as hawkish on the issue. i cannot find one member of the security establishment that is for containment. i have been looking for years, and i cannot find them. right now, their view is if america is leading, holdback, but if america does not lead, the same people that have been urging caution will be the same people urging israel forward. i think a certain level, the tone will be very different from the past defense minister, but the message will not be fundamentally different. what
. the foreign enemies, is he saying directly, basically, that the united states has tried to call hugo chavez? >> reporter: no, wolf. they didn't go so far. they sort of separate ideas he said that they had made contact with venezuela military personnel to try to convince them to become and didn't go into detail. as far as the attacking the health of chavez, the inoculations, made a reference to arafat, he seemed to drum up support from chavez's religious supporters because this is the man, after all, who will have to run in elections if chavez either dies or isn't capable of assuming the full responsibilities of the president she, wolf. >> we should point out that officials flatly deny the allegations against these u.s. embassy personnel, the allegations hurled against them for the expulsion of these two americans. all right. we'll stay in close touch with you, shasta. thanks very much. >>> he's one of the most talked about republican names for the next presidential election and in his new book the former florida governor jeb bush tackles one of the most contentious issues tackling the count
those capabilities that the united states has, especially given the debate we're having today that high probability that chemical weapons have been used in the country of syria. this is probably the time, as the president called for that red line, this is the time we need to take action, if we're going to prevent needless civilian casualties. >> rose: you see, the reason you are more credible on this is you're chairman house intelligence committee and you have access to information, the chair of the committee has access, i think, more than anyone else, and the president, obviously -- the president probably sees more information that you haven't seen. and they seem to be careful about this. and they're not wanting to take it to the next step. why is that? >> yeah, and i would dispute that the president sees more-- the president gets a daily briefing that's certainly narrowed down. and i don't have those same restrictions on the narrow down. so we have the opportunity get more broadly into these issues, and look at all of the reports as they come in. and i argue that's my job as chairman
the united states can support the man who killed the syrian people. >> inside syria, government forces are accused of dropping bombs on civilians. there are also reports of fighting in damascus, and on the border of syria and iraq. the united nations is expected to announce that the number of syrian refugees -- this is not until the number who have registered as refugees. the u.n. believes the 950,000 people have fled syria since the conflict began, and 4 million syrians are displaced. in jordan they are hosting more than 300,000 people. around 320,000 are thought to be living in lebanon. >> there are bad conditions in the camp with the toilets far away and we are in the middle of the desert. there are only two bakeries. >> this is different than living in our own country and we suffer from this new environment. we try to connect with the new come back streets, they are suffering from this because they are not working here, and this is very expensive. >> john kerry is in egypt as he continues his tour of egypt and the middle east. he has met the secretary general and he is urging egypt
was in the united states illegally looking for work in washington state. she asked the suspects to bring the children to the united states and she paid them repeatedly. $5,000, eventually but the suspects never brought the kids here and threatened to kill them if she went to the police. she fine -- finally did. the two are held on felony charges in san jose. >> an assault rifle stolen from a san francisco police car on saturday has been recovered. police have released few details of how or where they got the weapon back. the ar-15 was taken from an unmarked car like this one which was parked and locked while officers were working in the market neighborhood. it is only issued to specially trained officers. >> a memorial is held on thursday for the two santa cruz police officers shot and killed in the line of duty last tuesday. a motorcade is scheduled to start at 8:45 on ocean street. the memorial for detective sergeant butch baker and detective elizabeth butler was moved to the pavilion in san jose. the service will start at noon. we will broadcast it live going at 11:00 a. on abc7 news
to the united states. >> i give you my best wishes. >> and we look at the lives of john paul ii and the career to date of pope benedict xvi. >>> good evening and welcome to a second look. pope john paul ii came to san francisco at the time that the city was at the grips of the aids epidemic. what the pope did helped to comfort those with aids. he reached out and touched them offering a blessing an hope of healing. we have a report from that day. beginning with rita williams who was at mission dolores with the pope's visit to the california's oldest mission. >> reporter: john paul ii warmly greeted those along the center aisle of the pope. some of the 900 invited guests. the pope then approached the nine pews of aids patients. and certainly the most moving moment came when 4-year-old brendan ororke reached out to hug the holy father. little brendan contracted aids from a blood transfusion at birth. the pope then moved to other aids sufferers, most of them gay. it was the first time the leader of a catholic church has met directly with aids sufferers. from there the pope went alone to pray in th
countries have enjoyed unprecedented prosperity, and so has the united states. our nation is, after all, a pacific power. for those of us in california, asia's not the far east. for us it's the near west. [laughter] and none of the prosperity would have been possible without the stability that america's security umbrella brought to asia. but what has been the norm for generations is now starting to change. perhaps the catalyst of this change is the perception, either rightly or wrongly, that the balance of power in asia is undergoing a once in a lifetime transformation. what we are seeing is that asia's collective attention is gradually shifting away from economic prosperity to, instead, security concerns. where nations used to focus on trade and commerce, i now they discuss nationalism. military budgets. and even provocative behavior. look no further than the territorial disputes in the east china and south china seas as prime examples. for these reasons we must shift away from the old approach which unnecessarily divided the region and separated economic engagement from our political
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states' relationship with afghanistan faced new strains today. two u.s. soldiers were killed in an insider attack following pointed accusations by afghan president hamid karzai that the u.s. is colluding with the taliban. tensions were evident everywhere today from an american officer in kabul yelling at troops who had mistakenly shot to death two civilians to wardeck province where the afghans had ordered all special u.s. forces to leave by yesterday. there an afghan policeman gunned down two american soldiers and two other police officers before being killed himself. all of this, as newly confirmed secretary of defense chuck hagel concluded his first trip to afghanistan. the visit was difficult from the start, a suicide bombing outside the afghan defense ministry on saturday as he met with nato commanders nearby. >> i wasn't sure what it was. i was in a briefing. but we're in a war zone. i've been in war. you know, shouldn't be surprised when a bomb goes off. >> woodruff: then on sunday a verbal broadside from afghan pr
's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function cont
of the launch last year. today's launch app in response to ongoing drills by the united states and south korea. the pentagon says this only heightens the nuclear threat. coming up we are going to have the latest news from the pentagon and a discussion with a former u.s. ambassador to the united nations, john bolton. but first, we are awaiting a speech by one of the most outspoken critics of obama's health care law and momentarily he'll be addressing this year's conservative political action conference cpac as it's known. hello, everyone, glad you're with us, i'm gregg jarrett and welcome to america's news headquarters. >> thanks for joining us, i'm hell they are childress. and america's most influential conservatives, and speaking michele bachmann, take a look at her live there. in a few minutes the health care debate will take center stage with dr. ben carson, who is considered a trail blazer by some republicans, for his views. molly henneberg is there at cpac live with the latest, molly? >> reporter: good morning, heather, good morning, gregg. yes, dr. carson will speak after michele bachman
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